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An Invitation To Join A Journey To Next Level Healthcare Leadership

By DrScott – Posted on March 11, 2015: You already know healthcare is in a time of tremendous transition.

The Question is what role will you play in this change?  How will you skillfully navigate these waters as a leader in your organization or system?  How will you win or lose in the next 3, 5, and 10 years?

Without question your organization will realize greater success if you are prepared to lead.  The greater your capacity, the greater your success will be – from revenue to influence.

How prepared are you to lead?  Do you have a comprehensive, cohesive and integral skill set that allows you to navigate and lead a team through the challenges coming at you today, and will it expand as your role grows?

We are looking for a select group of leaders who want to play a key role for their companies and for the country in this transformation.  The format will be an interactive, collegial exploration of your personal skills in the context of learning proven and transformational leadership skills for groups, corporations, and systems.  This course is for lifelong learners who want to take themselves to the next level.

If you would be interested in learning more please contact us at shelley.egan@stagen.com and/or consider joining us Tuesday, May 26, 2015 for lunch at the Stagen Leadership – the PDF brochure on this course is attached below.

Again, please RSVP to shelley.egan@stagen.com.

ILP Informational Session

When: Tuesday, May 26th

Time:12:30-2:00pm

Where: 3535 Travis St. | Suite 100 Dallas, TX 75204

*Parking is available underneath the building.

Stagen ILP – February ‘Osler’ Class

Here’s to a great future for every person accessing the US Healthcare System – and here’s to the leaders who are going to make it happen.  Hope to see or hear from you soon.

Scott Conard, MD

Course Co-leader

Stagen ILP – Osler Class

www.stagen.com

 

Avoiding the #3 Cause of Death in the USA: US Hospitals & What You Need To Know About It – Part 2

The gauntlet had been laid.  Don Berwick and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) had challenged hospitals in America to save 100,000 lives.  Time was ticking away, educational programs, mentoring, training had begun but would they achieve the goal?

Eighteen months later on June 14th 2006 at 9 a.m. – Dr. Berwick took the stage to announce the results: “Hospitals enrolled in the 100,000 Lives Campaign have collectively prevented an estimated 122,300 avoidable deaths and, as importantly, have begun to institutionalize the new standards of care that will continue to save lives and improve health outcomes into the future.”

But that was only the beginning.  Remember, if there are 5,723 registered hospitals in the US, this initiative got 2,300 of them to commit in the first few months.  By the end of the campaign 3,100 hospitals had enlisted.  But thousands of Americans were still dying in US hospitals from preventable causes each month.  So the IHI moved the goal – in December 2006, IHI launched a second, expanded effort, the Five Million Lives campaign.   At its formal close in December 2008, the Campaign celebrated the enrollment of 4,050 hospitals, with more than 2,000 facilities pursuing each of the Campaign’s 12 interventions to reduce infection, surgical complication, medication errors, and other forms of unreliable care in facilities. Eight states enrolled 100% of their hospitals in the Campaign, and 18 states enrolled over 90% of their hospitals in the Campaign.

In 2011 the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius and Dr. Berwick launched the Partnership for Patients, which brings together hospitals, employers, physicians, nurses, and patient advocates along with state and federal governments in an effort to make hospital care safer, more reliable, and less costly.  The Partnership for Patients aimed to decrease preventable hospital-acquired conditions by 40 percent by the end of 2013, resulting in approximately 1.8 million fewer injuries to patients and more than 60,000 lives saved over the next three years. It also sought to reduce hospital readmissions by 20 percent by decreasing the rate of preventable complications during transitions from one care setting to another. The Partnership was to be funded by up to $1 billion in federal money made available under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, including $500 million through the Community-Based Care Transitions Program and up to $500 million through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation.    At the core of this initiative are 26 Hospital Engagement Networks, with 3,700 hospitals, working with health care providers and institutions to identify best practices and solutions to reduce hospital acquired conditions and readmissions.  Early results are showing strong progress in 8 of the 10 patient safety priority areas of the Partnership for Patients, more findings are scheduled to be released soon.

But recall that only 3,700 of the 5,723 hospitals in the US are engaged, meaning that over 2,000 hospitals are not on board and thousands of Americans are still suffering unnecessarily.  And recognize that this is looking at the prevention of adverse events, not at which institutions are the best at different procedures.  The best spine hospital may not be (and often isn’t) the best heart surgery facility in your community.

So how do you find the right hospital?  It takes research and time. It also takes a willingness to sift through a lot of different data to tease out what information would be important to you. Let’s think through a visit to the hospital – the quality of the health care a patient receives depends on many things besides the skill of the surgeon. Many health care providers at a hospital will be directly involved in care before, during, and after surgery. The metrics a patient will want to know span a broad spectrum of considerations, from scientific data on mortality and complications associated with previous treatment of patients with the same condition to the more subjective data on how patients respond to the physician and staff managing their care.

A result of this complexity in defining a good hospital is the proliferation of information sites that exist. In addition to the payers websites (carriers who are often dependent on contracting agreements with the hospitals), patients can go to anything from yelp.com and Angie’s List (which also provide reviews on low complexity services like dry cleaning), to state report card sites or national sites such as Hospital Compare which may or may not have information on metrics associated with your condition. For heavier science aficionados, there are reporting agencies like CareChecks and The Dartmouth Atlas which may look at patient outcomes on a larger system level. Reports are also often put out by institutions such as the Kaiser Foundation or Commonwealth Fund that speak to hospital quality.  Somewhere in the middle of this very complex gamut are sites like Vitals or Health Grades. More traditional outlets such as Consumer Reports or the US News & World Report create hospital listings as well.

But it is not just the hospital.  The doctor and the care team he or she works with make a significant difference.  In the next blog we will consider how to find and use these “best in class” doctors.

Avoiding the #3 Cause of Death in the USA: US Hospitals & What You Need To Know About It – Part 1

By DrScott – Posted on March 18, 2014 on www.compassphs.com

Preventable Adverse Events (PAE’s) are the #3 cause of death in the US, leading to between 210,000 and 440,000 American deaths annually.  This must stop.  But how?  The answer involves one of the best stories in US healthcare history.

It started when Dr. Donald Berwick, the co-founder, president and CEO of the Cambridge-based Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), was driving with his son, Dan to the airport.  Dan, a political campaign strategist, explained that he was bringing 350 volunteers to Florida for a weekend to knock on 50,000 doors for his candidate.

Awed by the numbers, Berwick, 57 at the time and a clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Health Care Policy at Harvard, shared IHI’s frustration about the slow pace of change in medicine when it came to adopting practices known to improve care and reduce errors.  As the former head of quality-of-care measurement for a large HMO, Berwick knew the numbers: As many as 98,000 American hospital patients die annually from poor care or medical errors. IHI researchers estimate that approximately 15 million incidents of medical harm occur in U.S. hospitals annually, roughly 40,000 every single day.

So, Berwick asked his son the critical question: “What makes your work so effective?” Dan explained what it takes to run a successful political campaign – coming up with concrete numbers (i.e. how many people you want to reach), establishing field offices to reach more people locally, inviting the widest possible participation, giving specific instructions to workers, and setting a deadline.

The IHI  only had 75 people on staff at the time and no way to mount the national campaign needed to create any significant change, or did they?  On December 14th 2004, Dr. Berwick gave a speech to a room full of hospital administrators.  He said, “Here is what I think we should do.  I think we should save 100,000 lives.  And I think we should do that by June 14, 2006 – 18 months from today.  Some is not a number; soon is not a time.  Here’s the number: 100,000.  Here’s the time: June 14, 2006.”

To accomplish this the IHI proposed six specific interventions for hospitals to adopt that had been proven to reduce unnecessary deaths.  If you have been reading the blogs on the book Switch by Dan and Chip Heath, you will appreciate that the “rider” now has a clearly defined goal to achieve.

But this was a challenge for hospitals to embrace and get behind.  If they did embrace it, it implied that unnecessary deaths were occurring in their hospitals.  So, Dr. Berwick made it personal.  At his speech he asked the mother of a girl who had been killed by a medical error to join him.  She said, “I’m a little speechless, and I’m a little sad, because I know that if this campaign had been in place four or five years ago, that Josie would be fine….  But, I’m happy, and thrilled to be a part of this, because I know you can do it, because you have to do it.”  Another guest on the stage, the North Carolina State Hospital Association Chair, then spoke up: “An awful lot of people for a long time have had their heads in the sand on this issue, and it’s time to do the right thing.  It’s as simple as that.”  (Switch: the elephant was motivated).

The IHI made joining the campaign easy; hospital CEO’s only had to sign a one page form.  Once a hospital enrolled, the IHI team helped them embrace the new interventions.  Research, step by step instructions guide and training were provided, and regular teleconferences with the hospital leaders to share their victories and struggles were arranged.  Hospitals with early successes were encouraged to become mentors of hospitals who joined the campaign later. (Switch: the path had been made easy).

But would they achieve the goal? Eliminating errors and documenting the results had never been done this way in the US Healthcare system. As a patient, the challenge of finding an excellent facility and doctor to use can be daunting.