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Switching Employees On: Using Video to Entertain, Engage, and Educate

By DrScott – Posted on February 27, 2014 on www.compassphs.com

Second in the Switching Employees On: Using Video to Entertain, Engage, and Educate Series

Heart disease is the #1 killer of Americans. The problem is that we often “feel fine” until it is too late – 50% of men and 66% of women die the first time they feel chest pain, according to the American Heart Association. To “turn the elephant” toward a new path away from unnecessary heart attacks and strokes to a long vital life requires creative interventions. In this video all three principles from Switch, How to Change Things When Change is Hard by Dan and Chip Health are addressed.

  1. The rider is directed to “get your biometrics and screening done even though you feel fine”.
  2. The elephant is motivated because “wonderful people who ‘felt fine’ did not get to be there for their spouse and children”.
  3. The path to better care is made clear by “contacting your Health Pro if you do not know what tests are recommended for you, or you need a high quality doctor.”

Using this and other tools this employer has been able to increase annual physicals among its insured members over time. Watch the video here

Proactive Providers Save Lives and Money

By DrScott – Posted on November 26, 2013 on www.compassphs.com

In my private practice in the 1990s, I often would see patients for 7 to 15 minutes, three times a year, trying to inspire them and direct them in management of high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other medical conditions. One particular patient I remember was a mechanic working at a large defense contractor. He had diabetes, high cholesterol, and an at-risk blood pressure. Every year he would come in for his physical because it was required by his employer. I would test his blood and consistently find that his cholesterol and other numbers were not well managed. We talked about how important it was to treat these conditions. I would offer additional medications and teach him to improve his lifestyle. He always assured me that he “felt fine” and didn’t think there was anything significantly wrong. A year later nothing changed and he continued down the same path.

Then one year, he came in with a form from his employer and asked me to fill in his numbers to then send back to his employer. Upon completing the form and handing it back to him, he said he had a new incentive program at work and was rewarded if his numbers met the goal. I asked him if he was willing to take additional medications and he said he would do “whatever it takes”. Low and behold, he saw a dietician, took additional medicine, and got his numbers to goal. Upon receiving the reward from his employer, he and his wife used that money to take a trip in their RV to the Pacific Northwest.

This continued for the next several years with him maintaining and managing his numbers to goal because his employer would reward him for his behavior. After he retired he was no longer incentivized, lost focus on his numbers, and had a significant heart attack several years later. I believe we prevented this for years through his engagement.

It was through interactions like this that it became clear to me that seeing a patient for 7 to 15 minutes, three times a year was only a portion of the solution. Having a partnership with employers that encourage and support employees engaging in proactive healthcare was equally important. Through this partnership, employees would win significantly.