Primary Care

Primary Care: Are You Busy Or Effective (or Both)?

May of 2018 we turned on dashboards on the Value of Care for a group of 400 providers. On the dashboard the scale of 0 – 100, a 70 was considered “good value,” below this there were significant opportunity for higher value care. The average score for our providers was 35.

Within hours the phones began to ring – “my care is better than this,” “my dashboard is wrong,” “your data is incomplete” – the general sentiment was “I am making a bigger difference that you are saying I am.”

Let’s look at the facts – they were busy – usually filling their schedule to 80+%, moving through the day giving 100% to each person sitting before them. At the end of the day going home feeling tired but sure of their contribution to their patients. They must be high quality, effective, and their patients are benefiting based on days, months, and years of committed work.

So why the relatively low scores? We set up teams to investigate. The ability to click down to a member level allowed the providers to see what was going on with their patients. Were the patient really theirs or not? An examination revealed YES! Then why weren’t their blood pressure, cholesterol, asthma, blood sugars, immunizations, and screenings not at goal?

Barbara was supposed to come back in but never did, Bob travels all the time, Suzie stopped taking her meds, but never communicated it, John’s son got ill and he missed his appointment and never came back in…. The list of reasons went on and on. But the reality did not change – we were confusing being busy with meeting the needs of our patients. Often, we were not seeing the patients that needed us the most.

This lead to new systems, new ways of proactive (and automated) outreach. Soon the right patients were in the right practice at the right time. Quality took a jump up. Providers knew they were doing the best thing for all of their patients, not just the ones in front of them.

Busy was now productive and we were adding years to the lives and life to the years of those we served!

Is your practice busy, effective, or both?

Proactive Providers Save Lives and Money

By DrScott – Posted on November 26, 2013 on www.compassphs.com

In my private practice in the 1990s, I often would see patients for 7 to 15 minutes, three times a year, trying to inspire them and direct them in management of high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other medical conditions. One particular patient I remember was a mechanic working at a large defense contractor. He had diabetes, high cholesterol, and an at-risk blood pressure. Every year he would come in for his physical because it was required by his employer. I would test his blood and consistently find that his cholesterol and other numbers were not well managed. We talked about how important it was to treat these conditions. I would offer additional medications and teach him to improve his lifestyle. He always assured me that he “felt fine” and didn’t think there was anything significantly wrong. A year later nothing changed and he continued down the same path.

Then one year, he came in with a form from his employer and asked me to fill in his numbers to then send back to his employer. Upon completing the form and handing it back to him, he said he had a new incentive program at work and was rewarded if his numbers met the goal. I asked him if he was willing to take additional medications and he said he would do “whatever it takes”. Low and behold, he saw a dietician, took additional medicine, and got his numbers to goal. Upon receiving the reward from his employer, he and his wife used that money to take a trip in their RV to the Pacific Northwest.

This continued for the next several years with him maintaining and managing his numbers to goal because his employer would reward him for his behavior. After he retired he was no longer incentivized, lost focus on his numbers, and had a significant heart attack several years later. I believe we prevented this for years through his engagement.

It was through interactions like this that it became clear to me that seeing a patient for 7 to 15 minutes, three times a year was only a portion of the solution. Having a partnership with employers that encourage and support employees engaging in proactive healthcare was equally important. Through this partnership, employees would win significantly.